Austria, the Loos Haus, Michaelerplatz 3, Vienna
‘The Loos Haus in Vienna (also known as the Goldman & Salatsch Building) is regarded as one of the most important structures built in the ‘Wiener Moderne’. The building marks the rejection of historicism, as well as the ornaments used by the Werner Secession. Its appearance shocked Vienna’s citizens, since their overall taste was still very much historically oriented. Because of the lack of ornaments on the façade, people called it the ‘house without eyebrows’.1


The building was commissioned as a store for the Goldman and Salatsch men’s clothing company of Vienna. Today the Loos House is a branch of the Raffaisen Bank.2 The House of Michaelerplatz is Loos’ most famous building but also the most controversial as it was built in 1911 of steel concrete construction and was regarded as ‘dreadfully plain’. However the lower part of the building could not be considered plain as the façade is finished with green Karystian cipollino and Skyros marble, providing rows of columns (which are not load bearing), as well as large piers, rising up to the first floor, clad in the same cipollino. The upper floor windows were provided with window boxes to relieve the plainness. (Plates 9.1 & 9.2)3

1 http://architecture/loos-haus-vienna
Lazzarini, L., Poikiloi Lithoi, versiculores maculae: I marmi colorati della Grecia antica. Storia, uso, diffusione, cave, geologia, caratterizzazione scientifica, archeometria, deterioramento, Roma, 2007, p.188.
2 http:/manchesterhistory.net/architecture/1920/adolflooshouse.html
3 http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/michaerlerplatz/index.html and http://manchesterhistory.netarchitecture/1920/adolflooshaus

Maps and Plates

Plate 9.1.jpg

Plates 9.1 & 9.2 Cipollino marble-lined façade of the Loos House – Michaelerplatz, Vienna.

Plate 9.2.jpg

Plates 9.1 & 9.2 Cipollino marble-lined façade of the Loos House – Michaelerplatz, Vienna.